Japanese Coins and Cash

Japanese Coins and Cash

Written by sonicsuns

Topics: Everything, Tips

Today I’ll be giving you a brief visual tour of Japanese money. Cash is important here, because hardly anyone uses or accepts credit cards for daily purchases. The Japanese currency is the Yen. One yen is approximately equal to one penny. (But lately, the yen has been getting more expensive, so a yen is more than a penny. Check for yourself, because these things always change.) For each of the coins and bills below, I’ve listed its American equivalent, followed by the actual amount in parenthesis.
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A penny (1 yen)


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/Ah, the lonely 1-yen coin. Nobody likes these things. I’m not even sure that vending machines take them. By the way, the “take a penny, leave a penny” jars that we have in America can also be found in Japan, just with yen and not pennies.
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A nickel (5 yen)


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/The 5-yen coin is the only coin that doesn’t use Arabic Numerals. That is, they write “5″ with a Japanese symbol, rather than the “normal” way that we write it. It’s also one of the two coins that has a hole in the middle.
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A dime (10 yen)


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A half-dollar (50 yen)


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/In America, the highest coin is technically the dollar coin. But really, how often do you see those? If we narrow it down to common coins, the highest American coin is worth 25 cents, and the lowest bill is worth one dollar. Japan goes a bit father with coins. The highest Japanese coin is worth 5 dollars (500 yen), and the lowest Japanese bill is worth 10 dollars (1000 yen).
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A one-dollar bill (100 yen)


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A five-dollar bill (500 yen)


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All the coins in a row, from least valuable to most valuable. (Bigger doesn't always mean better)


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A ten-dollar bill (1000 yen)


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/There’s another bill worth 2000 yen (that’s twenty dollars), but it’s pretty rare, kindof like the 2-dollar bill in America. I haven’t actually seen one yet.
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/UPDATE: Finally found one:
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$20 (2000 Yen)


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A 50-dollar bill (5000 yen)


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A hundred-dollar bill (10,000 yen)


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/Because Japan relies on cash so much, cashiers aren’t particularly surprised when they encounter a 10,000 yen bill. They make change easily.
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/Well that’s it for the visual tour. I leave you now with a bit of advice from my mother:
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/“This isn’t monopoly money, so be careful.”
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  • Mom

    Love the visual tour of the coins and bills.
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    /Your mother sounds very wise indeed. :)

  • http://TrevorClan@aol.com Mom

    Love the visual tour of the coins and bills.
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    /Your mother sounds very wise indeed. :)

  • emma

    Thanks for the tour, Jimmy!
    -emma

  • http://www.eaglenationalmint.com/Coins/Half-Dollars walking liberty half dollar

    Wow, these Japanese Coins are really looking just fabulous. And I really like them so much. I have some ancient coins of Japan. And I have a big collection of different types world coins. But I have not really any type of information regarding these coins. These are really one of the best existing thing in this world.

    • Christianbentleigh

      I have these coins

    • Theresa Turpin

      I have some of those coins and I was wondering what they was worth also

  • Андрей Третьяков

    And here’s a great handy online tool that could help you understand and convert emperors’ dates on the Japanese coins: 
    http://apps.creounity.com/time_machine/index.php?go=japan.php&lang=en

  • Jordanalex1099

    Wow I have been wondering what these coins were thanks

  • http://www.jeremyahenry.com/ Jeremy Henry

    Hay thanks for this post Got a few Yens with a hand full of change, and was wondering what there worth was… Plus I always been a fan of Japanese lettering it intrigued me to know what they where.. also I think the yen is made from aluminum and hence there short value.. maybe who nows one day they might be worth something… Might hold on to them just to show off… LoL…

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