Power Sockets in Japan

Power Sockets in Japan

Written by sonicsuns

Topics: Everything, Tips

Before I came to Japan, I bought a nifty converter-thing to allow me to plug my American electronics into Japanese power sockets.
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/That turned out to be entirely pointless, because all my American electronics work fine in Japanese outlets.
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/However, it’s true there are still a few differences between Japan and America. (See here and here for reference)
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/First, the Japanese sockets almost never have that third pin.
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American version; three pins


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The Japanese version; only two pins


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So if you need to plug in something with a third pin, you’ll have to use an adapter.

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/Japanese power runs at 100 volts and 50 or 60 Hertz, while American power runs at 120 volts and 60 Hertz. I imagine those terms sound confusing, but basically it means that Japan uses a different kind of electricity. However, that doesn’t mean you’re screwed. Take a look at my laptop’s power brick:
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Almost every laptop has one of these


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/The tiny text tells me that the input can be anywhere from 100 to 240 volts and from 50 to 60 Hertz, so I’m ok.
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/I also brought this razor from America:
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/When I charge it, the charge light doesn’t shine at normal brightness, so that tells me that something is going on. But it isn’t something serious; the razor still charges just fine.
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/I’ve also charged my American Nintendo DS without incident.
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/But I can’t make guarantees for any other electronics from America. In particular, anything that’s designed to generate heat is unlikely to work in Japan, because most heat-generation tech assumes a particular voltage.
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/If you’re really in doubt about something, leave it at home and buy the Japanese equivalent.

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